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20121027
20121104
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the distractions, and listen and learn and read and question more about who is really benefiting and educating ourselves on how we got here and figure out how each of us can make a positive impact, that's the way to change the system. knowledge sharing, truth-seeking, open debate, fresh ideas, and discovering a common ground among each other. no matter what your political persuasion, we are the critical time in our nation's history. it's time to take our country back from the private interests who control our beliefs, our opinions and our lives. [cheers and applause] thank you very much for joining us tonight. our moderator this evening is award-winning broadcaster and media personality larry king. [cheers and applause] >> don't, don't. >> his new online home is aura tv and he is the host of "larry king now." welcome larry. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. and welcome everybody. i'm very happy to be doing this. i think all voices should be heard. a few notes about the format for tonight's debate, really easy job for me because it's a rather simple format. each candidate will have an opportu
at the expansion of the government and education. when we separated education out of health, education, and welfare. we have spent more money at education at the federal government level, money that could have been used better at the local levels. we have to look at these duplicative programs. we have got to move away from baseline budget to zero-based budget. >> the gao had a study that counted 33 agencies that are doing the same thing. we need to streamline these agencies. seven are focused on businesses and trade. let's streamline them. we have attacked medicare fraud and abuse. we need to continue to do that, in all government agencies. i spent years going into numerous fortune 500 countries -- companies looking for these inefficiencies. i plan using my government to find this week. >> can either of you give me any numbers? the department of energy? >> close to $85 billion. you are looking at a guy, never been in politics before, and i found three wasteful programs in the government. the combined savings of -- if every single member of the house was going and looking for wasteful programs, thin
into good government. what we need in maine and in america is to invest in education, infrastructure, to reform our taxes, to reduce our spending, and to get this economy on track so the government can provide an environment for small businesses to grow and prosper and to help families get through this economy. the disparity in income is the biggest problem. what might two major opponents offer is more of the same. >> we have some business owners. does anyone want to answer? >> i am not a small business owner. i never said i was. i am self-employed. i am a free-lance writer. if you are a political pundits like i am, if you run for senate, you are no longer a political pundit. not only have i not created a job, but i cost myself a job by running for office. on that question, i do not have a good record. >> i think it is sad the recently we have looked at government services as being separate from competency. the u.s. senate is a job. it is a complex job. legal issues, economic issues, financial issues. i own six businesses. everyone here in maine and across the country talks about job
, for students, their issues around student loans and affordable education and what is happening to state colleges and universities, public support for them, both at the state and federal support, a key budget decisions about supporting student education. those are essential for students, as well as the job market when they're graduating from school and what kinds of policies are out there. one of the big problems for women was when there were budget constraints. many public-sector jobs were being contracted and even layoffs with teachers and social workers and others who are largely women losing their jobs. women were hit in a double whammy way. they lost their jobs in the kinds of services they were providing. this affects students in education directly. >> is the media doing a good job in informing the population about issues related to rights and what is why not? >> as far as i'm concerned, the media could always do more. that is for sure. there is a lot of horse race aspect about this -- who is ahead? is it 1%? 2%? those are interesting, but for people who want to have the facts to h
an all-in strategy and invest in training and education and leave the congress on both sides. we're going to do this, but i'm going to take the weight. if there are tough decisions, blame them on me. that is what executive leadership is about. that is what the president is determined to do after the election. he has sort of hinted about it. i would talk about it. governor romney, who is a problem solver, he would be inclined to do the same thing. people respond to leadership. the paralysis that you see just needs a good idea, and figs in the debt is a great idea. have a little tough leadership. if we can get both components, we can get things done. >> i want to throw out a couple of datapoint. the generation gap is significant. senior turnout is much greater. they're much more enthusiastic than they were four years ago. voting among seniors could be a very significant impact on the outcome of the campaigns. second, when you talk about leadership and where the voters are, one of the common complaint in this town are -- is that voters are the problem. they will not accept any cuts. that is
at what was covered thoroughly. one of them was education, and at one point the president but did meehan said -- looked at me and said we have not discussed education at all, and i said in my head, sorry, he spent the first 20 minutes of the first debate talking about education. we knew -- remember, the first questions all came from the town hall, so i could not just come off with a question that was not represented in their questions. we knew that syria, iran and israel would be thoroughly covered. we didn't feel the need to fill the hole. >> but immigration and gun control might not. >> it might not. >> you would assume that would be the last chance. >> how do you prepare assume each of you have an individual method. >> i make myself insane. i shut myself off in the house with a lot of cards, read books the candidates have written, stump speeches, right about 100 questions, knowing that i might get about 20 in, and i do not think i got that many then i rehearsed. -- many. then i rehearse. then, after all of the, you have to stop. you have to know it well enough that you can't stand to
that president obama and my husband are making quality investments to move us forward on education. i'm also involved in this election as a woman who cares about the direction of our country. i have seen barack and joe said that for our rights and freedoms every single day. -- stand up for our rights and freedoms every single day. the very first law put an obama signed with the lily ledbetter. the president and vice- president know how important it is for women to make our own decisions about our own bodies, our own health care. [applause] so many women of my generation have fought hard for roe versus wade, access to contraception and for equal rights. we don't want out daughters and granddaughters to have to go back and fight the same battles that we fought decades ago. [applause] we cannot forget about the importance of the supreme court in the direction this country could take. finally, i care about this country. about this election as a military mom. our son beau is a in the delaware national army guard and he served in a rack for a year. -- iraq for a year. i had the honor of meeting ma
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7